Relationship of Primary and Secondary Sources

Date:  2021-04-02 23:41:27
2 pages  (566 words)
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Harvey Mudd College
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Essay
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This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

Learning that does incorporate sources and scholarly work is fruitless. Primarily, students embody their knowledge from prior research, discussions and consequential findings. As a result, it is nearly compulsory for students to review a list of sources and in some instances, parade their importance in relation to each other. This essay will adopt a similar course. Precisely, it addresses two sources one of which is primary while the other is secondary. It will prepare a summary of both and proceed to present their arguments. After that, it will outline the connection between them and conclude with the larger part. In this section, it will explain why the sources are key to the final project.

Part 1: Summary

The primary source, Heart disease, summarizes the relationship between heart attacks and coronary blockage. According to the source, coronary arteries are vital to supplying oxygenated blood through the body. This oxygen is especially vital to the heart, and if its muscles cannot access oxygenated blood, it is bound to fail (DeSilva, 20). Notably, coronary vessels are blocked by a plaque which is artificial. Because of its waxy nature, the substance mainly breaks from the arteries causing a blood clot in the area. This clot may heighten separating the heart from exchanging blood with other organs.

The secondary source, Values and life styles in urban Asia, summarizes the relationship between lifestyles and coronary diseases. Strictly, it acknowledges that when people take certain drugs such as cocaine, they are on the verge of contracting coronary diseases. Also, emotional stress encourages coronary diseases, as well as extreme cold. Moreover, cigarette smoking and excessive cholesterol intake coupled with minimal exercises multiply the chances of coronary clogging.

Part 2: Argument

The primary source argues that without coronary clogging, there would be no heart attacks (DeSilva, 25). The secondary source, suggests that without smoking, excessive cholesterol intakes and drug abuse, coronary clogging would not occur (Inoguchi, 23).

Part 3: Connection

A closer look at both sources indicate a close association. Theoretically, doctors argue that people who die of heart attacks have a particular lifestyle resembling that suggested from the secondary source. Precisely, physical inactivity, smoking, drug abuse and excessive intake of cholesterol. This source is a direct support to the primary source. This claim is especially true given that it suggests that coronary clogging causes a heart attack.

Part 4: Larger project

The larger project will entail evaluating the relationship between negative lifestyles and heart attacks. The paper will check the extent to which the claim of scientists is true which suggests that with positive lifestyles, not a single case of a heart attack would enter records. In this context, positive lifestyles suggest a life free of practices that encourage coronary clogging and consequential heart attacks.

Conclusion

In summary, this paper establishes the connection between primary and secondary sources at length. Through the analysis, it learns that the sources, though different have identical suggestions. Precisely, the issues suggested in the secondary source as a lead to coronary clogging feature in the primary source as a lead to heart attacks. The essay further learns that these two premises join through a claim by doctors suggesting that negative lifestyles lead to heart attacks. This relationship is, therefore, research-worthy. The essay suggests that the association evaluates further.

Works Cited

DeSilva, Regis. Heart Disease. 1st ed. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood, 2013. Print.

Inoguchi, Takashi. Values And Life Styles In Urban Asia. 1st ed. Tokyo: Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo, 2005. Print.

 

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