Constructivist Theory - Article Analysis Example

Date:  2021-03-30 09:36:26
4 pages  (972 words)
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Harvey Mudd College
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Dubinsky, E., & McDonald, M. A. (2001). APOS: A constructivist theory of learning in undergraduate mathematics education research. In The teaching and learning of mathematics at university level (pp. 275-282). Springer Netherlands.

In this article, the point that the authors are trying to put across is that, if any research conducted in mathematics education is based on a certain theoretical perspective, it is boosted in a number of ways. According to the authors, developing a model or theory in mathematics tutoring should be a strategy in understanding how to learn the subject, as well as the best educational program to assist in the learning. They are not of the opinion that a learning theory is a statement of the truth. Despite the fact that such a theory may or may not be an estimation of what actually happens when a scholar tries to learn one or more mathematical concepts, it is not the authors focus.

Dubinsky and McDonald describe one such known as the APOS Theory in the article. They go on to explain the role played by this theory in a curriculum development and research program, as well as how this program can help in developing the theory. The two authors go on to give a brief description of how the APOS theory makes it possible for the recruitment of a group of researchers specializing in undergraduate mathematics tutoring. In addition, they indicate how this theory can be utilized in specific research activities carried out by researchers as well as by other individuals not taking part in its development. This article can be found at https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6850/b01648bf43e15cbdbcf871b215c3cf44825d.pdfFlockhart, T. (2016). The problem of change in constructivist theory: Ontological security seeking and agent motivation. Review of International Studies, 1-22.

In this article, Flockhart tries to address the dilemma of co-determination when conducting constructivist theorizing on change. He does this by seeking to find out what motivates agent-led change. He also attempts to get a more detailed constructivist understanding of why explaining change seems an uphill task for constructivists while agents find it hard to undertake. The author found out that despite constructivism being arguably all about change, it has in the real sense operated with quite a shallow understanding of what change actually means. The theory has not put into consideration changes emergent nature. Rather, it focuses either on change in practice, change in identity or the influence of structural factors although it seldom focuses on all the three forms of change at once.

The bringing in of ontological security a something that motivates the undertaking- or failure to undertake- change making action has offered a better understanding of why agents in some cases agents decide to use their agencies. In addition, provides a link between various forms and processes of change that the constructivist theory as separately engaged in. by doing so, the framework that Flockhart presents in the article can account for influences that are rarely not considered when attempting to explain how change can be made to happen, particularly on how to change ineffective practices. This question happens to be among the most enduring when it comes to international relations. This article can be accessed at https://kar.kent.ac.uk/56235/1/RIS%20Accepted%20Manuscript%2006.06.%202016.pdfWeimer, A. A., Dowds, S. J. P., Fabricius, W. V., Schwanenflugel, P. J., & Suh, G. W. (2017). Development of constructivist theory of mind from middle childhood to early adulthood and its relation to social cognition and behavior. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 154, 28-45.

This article presents the results of two studies that looked at how constructivist theory of mind, abbreviated as ToM, developed during child hood and adolescence. According to the authors, this theory is the ability of a person to perceive other people as human beings. When children are able to put into consideration certain mental states such as thoughts, beliefs and desires, and the relationship between these states and behavior, then they have developed ToM. This study was influenced by the fact that not much is known about the way children understand the mind when they are aged between middle childhood going forward. A reason for this is because most research carried out on ToM development has concentrated on early childhood.

In the first study, the researchers came up with a new measure aimed at assessing how participants understood constructive and interpretive processes. These processes were implanted in comprehension, memory, comparison, attention, inference and planning. The second study then used this measure to test a meditational model whereby pro-social reasoning on conflict interceded the link between behavioral issues in high school and constructivist ToM. The studys results showed that the commencement of constructivist ToM takes place between late childhood and early adolescence. They also showed that adolescents possessing constructivist ToM that is more advanced have more pro-social reasoning on conflict. This is something that interceded the link with lesser serious behavioral issues while in high school once controlling had been done for sex and academic performance. In both studies, females in high school displayed more advanced constructivist when compared to males. This article can be accessed at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309713242_Development_of_constructivist_theory_of_mind_from_middle_childhood_to_early_adulthood_and_its_relation_to_social_cognition_and_behaviorReferences

Dubinsky, E., & McDonald, M. A. (2001). APOS: A constructivist theory of learning in undergraduate mathematics education research. In The teaching and learning of mathematics at university level (pp. 275-282). Springer Netherlands.

Flockhart, T. (2016). The problem of change in constructivist theory: Ontological security seeking and agent motivation. Review of International Studies, 1-22.

Weimer, A. A., Dowds, S. J. P., Fabricius, W. V., Schwanenflugel, P. J., & Suh, G. W. (2017). Development of constructivist theory of mind from middle childhood to early adulthood and its relation to social cognition and behavior. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 154, 28-45.

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