Report Sample on Peculiarities of Doing Business in Turkey

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University/College: 
Wesleyan University
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Report
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This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

In Turkey, there are some issues one should take note when undertaking a business planning meeting. For instance, one is required to plan for the meeting ahead of time at least two weeks in advance. One should not schedule meetings to be on public holidays and asks if an interpreter will be needed. Besides, Turkish business persons are strict on punctuality and one should also learn the titles and positions of the business persons that they are to meet (Cetin, Bahar & Griffiths, 2017).

The main religion in Turkey is Islam (Fuller, 2008). There are a couple of things that should be avoided when not only doing business with the Turkish people but also while communicating with them. Turkish people love and consider family as sacred and therefore, creating video games that disrespect the family institution is wrong and disrespectful. During conversations they stand closely to someone they are communicating with and this is not apprehensive. In addition, when creating a video game for this particular target market there is a need to ensure that certain gestures as well as body language that the Turkish people may consider offensive, rude, or even insulting should not be used. Some of these include pointing at someone using your finger as well as standing while pocketing ones hands or while holding ones hips.

Turkey is a free country that not only hosts many numbers of refugees but also its government offers them protection and consider them part of the society that opens more businesses opportunities. Hechavarria et al, (2017) state that though the country has in the recent past hosted refugees and other foreign nationals and is extremely polite and hospitable to foreigners, Turkey is averse to any foreign national taking a job that can be handled by Turkish Citizen. The country prefers that foreigners who are hired in a company, be hired for the purpose of undertaking functions that any of it citizens cannot handle such as taking a function that requires native expertise of a foreign language. They also prefer doing business with a foreign company that offers majority of employment slots to its citizens.

 

References

Atli, A. (2011). Businessmen as diplomats: The role of business associations in Turkey's foreign economic policy. Insight Turkey, 13(1), 109.

Hechavarria, D. M., Terjesen, S. A., Ingram, A. E., Renko, M., Justo, R., & Elam, A. (2017). Taking care of business: the impact of culture and gender on entrepreneurs blended value creation goals. Small Business Economics, 48(1), 225-257.

Erdilek, A. (2008). Internationalization of Turkish MNEs. Journal of Management Development, 27(7), 744-760.

Fuller, G. E. (2008). The new Turkish Republic: Turkey as a pivotal state in the Muslim world.

Onis, Z., & Bakir, C. (2007). Turkey's political economy in the age of financial globalization: The significance of the EU anchor. South European Society & Politics, 12(2), 147-164.

Wild, J. J., & Wild, K.L. (2015). International business: The challenges of globalization (8th ed.). Don Mills, Ontario: Pearson Education.

Cetin, Y., Bahar, M., & Griffiths, C. (2017). International Students' Views on Local Culture: Turkish Experience. Journal of International Students, 7(3), 467.

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