Freemason Embodies Positive Values

Date:  2021-03-13 03:34:39
4 pages  (1131 words)
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This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.
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This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

Throughout the course of history, many have painted the brotherhood of Freemasonry in dark light viewing it as a weird society. Its beliefs and practices have been made to appear as devilish and dark unlike the stark reality at hand, it is worth noting, that in the real sense Freemasonry is a society that perpetrates positive and upright moral values among its members.

Converton, Gillian. "A system of morality veiled in allegory: the private rituals and public performances of Freemasons in Winnipeg,1864-1900." Winnipeg: University of Winnipeg, 2005. Thesis/dissertation.

Gillian Converton of the University of Manitoba in his dissertation titled A system of morality veiled in allegory: the private rituals and public performance of freemasons in Winnipeg ,1864-1900 argues out that the practice of freemasonry is one that is rich in symbolic overtures all of which are aimed at reminding the members of the belief in a supreme being who requires the member to endeavor towards the betterment of humanity and goodwill.

Convertons uses logos to argue out that masonic symbolism is in fact positive and that most people are skeptical of them simply because they do not understand.

Their fear of the unknown blinds them into thinking that the society is in itself evil.

From my perspective it is clear that the author makes a strong case for pro masonic belief and tries to demystify the rumors of the masons as an evil devilish society but rather as a complicated society with proper moral values.

Hopkins, Henry. "Three lectures on freemasonry regarded as a moral and religious system." Oxford University, 1858.

In the book, the author takes time to demystify the religious practices of masonic society. The author is able to inform the reader of the development of such practices and their origins. He then explains why the public should view masonic Craft with high repute and honour. He makes the example of the lodge of St. Paul where the master guides the lodge into giving freemasonry a positive image and outlook contrary to that in the opinions of the masses.

Dr. Hopkins utilizes an excellent command of the English language to effectively bring out three beautiful aspects of masonic practice. Rich knowledge of the beliefs and history of the societys inner workings and terms clearly brings out the strong message that the society emphasizes in a strict oral code. A highly inquisitive system of information finding yields the deduction that Freemasonry is a highly structured moral-religious society which is suffering from negative prejudicing opinions and fears.

The author is very convincing in his argument and a reader is inclined towards changing their viewpoint and accepting the fact that freemasonry is not the devilish society many perceive it to be.

Whitman, Bernad. "An address [vindicating Freemasons from the charges brought against them...at the dedication of the masonic temple in Boston]." Massachusetts: Cambridge, 1832. 24. print book.

Bernad Whitman argues that it is unfair to judge freemasons based on the peculiar nature of their beliefs. He argues that it is wrong and immoral to view people as weird based on fact that one considers their practices not in sync with most of the social norms. As far as he is concerned; most of those quick to cast a bad name upon the masons perform very abnormal acts. He urges the reader not to judge them because most masons exhibit utmost virtue and righteousness.

The author appeals to the readers pathos to emotionally convince the reader that Freemasons are people of great repute. One is made to believe that Freemasons have impeccable standards as pertains honour and justice. The tactic works perfectly well and the author makes a strong point based on the fact that being a mason himself he knows and feels the prejudiced views against members who practice freemasonry.

One can safely conclude that the authors deep wealth of knowledge makes for a very strong argument. Well versed with the inner trappings of masonic society makes the author a rich source of knowledge on the moral standards among freemasons.

Brennan, J.F. "THE AMERICAN FREEMASON; A MONTHLY MASONIC MAGAZINE." New York, 1858. Print book.

The author argues that Masonic beliefs are a blend of the assimilation of positive values from most of the major religions in the world but freemasonry in itself is no religion. He states that the organization believes in combining the good aspects of each religion to mold their members in a morally upright manner. He further makes it clear that Christianity is the religion that matches most with Freemasonry and that most of its values on good morals are aligned to Christianity.

It is worth noting that the information is by itself very direct from the source since the author was an editor of a masonic magazine. The first line information from the official freemason magazine in America is credible enough as compared to speculative information from outside sources.

Brennan s therefore very good at making the reader believe that Freemasons borrow a lot of moral standards from the major religions of the world. He should however put more less emphasis on Christianity being the religion nearly ideal in line with Freemasons virtues.

Pike, Albert. Morals and Dogma: Scottish Rite in Freemasonry. lulu.com, 2013.

Albert Pike in his book Morals and Dogma: Scottish Rite in Freemasonry argues that the ultimate achievement of fulfillment is in labours that fulfill the creators will. He argues that it is not in religious belief but rather the conscience of a man and the conviction in his heart that make a Mason morally upright. The author makes a point that natural justice and that the society encourages purity, generosity and utmost goodwill among all its members.

Here Pike demonstrates that it is not the religion a man professes but rather the natural values that they believe in that is important. He argues out clearly extolling the emphasis the Craft places on honest goodwill and belief in a supreme being above all else.

His argument in my opinion however ignores the influence of an individuals religion on their convictions. He should however realise the religion into which a man is nurtured and cultured influences their behaviour to a very large extent and should therefore not be brushed aside.

WORKS CITED

BIBLIOGRAPHY Brennan, J.F. "THE AMERICAN FREEMASON; A MONTHLY MASONIC MAGAZINE." New York, 1858. Print book.

Converton, Gillian. "A system of morality veiled in allegory:the private rituals and public perfomances of Freemasons in Winnipeg,1864-1900." Winnipeg: University of Winnipeg, 2005. Thesis/dissertation.

Hopkins, Henry. "Three letures on freemasonry regarded as a moral and religious system." Oxford University , 1858.

Pike, Albert. Morals and Dogma: Scottish Rite in Freemasonry. lulu.com, 2013. Print book.

Whitman, Bernad. "An address[vindicating Freemasons from the charges brought against them...at the dedication of the masonic temple in Boston]." Massachausets: Cambridge, 1832. 24. print book.

 

 

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