Annotated Bibliography: Depression and College

Date:  2021-03-13 11:10:27
4 pages  (994 words)
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David Lester: College Student Stressors, Depression, And Suicidal Ideation: Psychological Reports: 2014, Vol 114, 1, 293-296.

The research was conducted to examine if stressors from university-related activities and stress from other life experiences varies in their influence to forecast suicidal and depression in university students. A sample of 165 students was interviewed (David 294). The study found that it is important to differentiate between the depression that results from academic studies and the stressful life actions that are appropriate to all persons regardless at university or not. The outcome of the current research shows that college pressure is not a powerful estimator of suicidal and depression ideation than is pressure from other features of daily life that is not related to the university experience.

Viji Natarajan, Milena Pavlova, Susan Kawasaki, Ray Gleason, Elissa Koff: Sleep debt and depression in female college students. 11Nov 2008.

The main aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the stressful events and sleep practices. Pilot research information was gathered about sleep practices schedules, interrelated factors and despair in female university scholars to examine whether their timetable concerning sleep relates to active signs. Similar research was conducted in a subsequent primary study under controlled conditions. The research used two methods those are CES-D and HAM-3 to measure depression. The study found out that about 20% of the scholars testified that weekday sleep debts of more than 2h and other 28% testified superior sleep debt. Among the female university students, who testified a 2h sleep debt or sleepiness during the day have higher chances of having melancholic signs than the rest (Regestein 36).

Susan R. Furr, John S. Westefeld, Gaye N. McConnell, J. Marshall Jenkins: Suicide and Depression Among College Students: A Decade Later: Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 2001, Vol. 32, No. 1, 97-100

The article seems to seek answers two questions. First, if depression and suicidal feelings decrease of increase among university scholars (Susan 97). Second, if situations about life are the most important to examine with suicidal or depression college scholars. The article found out that 53% of the sample tested reported depression experience from the start of college while 9% testified to have experienced suicidal thought during their college life.

Jihan Saber, Ruth Topsy Staten, Lynne A. Hall, Terry A. Lennie: The Relationship among Young Adult College Students Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Demographics, Life

Satisfaction, and Coping Styles Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 33:149156, 2012

The article analyzes the importance of replication style, designated demographic and life satisfaction in forecasting undergraduates stress, depression, and anxiety. A sample of 508 undergraduate students was interviewed aged 18-24. The study found out that adaptive copying is not an important forecaster of the three results variables. Decreasing maladaptive coping practices might positive impact (Mahmoud 150).

Ryan M. Hill, Ilya Yaroslavsky, Jeremy W. Pettit: Enhancing depression screening to identify college students at risk for persistent depressive symptoms: Affective Disorder 24 Nov 2014.

The article acknowledges that depressive symptoms are prevalent among college scholars and related to substantial academic impairment. A sample of 162 students was interviewed. The outcome identified two depressive signs. Persistence elevated depressive signs and decreasing depressive signs. Social withdrawal and undesirable feedback seeking were found to forecast membership in the obstinately elevated depressive symptoms. The article also learned that cut-score differentiated between the two signs (Ryan 5).

Henry Chung, MD; Michael C. Klein, Ph.D.; Daniel Silverman, MD, MPA; Janet Corson-Rickert, MD; Eleanor Davidson, MD; Patricia Ellis, NP A Pilot for Improving Depression Care on College Campuses: Results of the College Breakthrough Series Depression (CBSD) Project: JOURNAL OF AMERICAN COLLEGE HEALTH, VOL. 59, NO. 7

The article intention is to assist better implementation of a pilot quality enhancement scheme for despair treatment and identification in university health. A sample of 71,908 consisting of screened students for depression (Chung 628). One percent of the total number of students were treated and followed, and the majority of scheduled treatment process and clinical results objectives were accomplished. The study showed a real improvement in depression recognition and attention for university students.

Daniel Eisenberg, Henry Chung: Adequacy of depression treatment among college students in the United States 3 January 2012

The article approximated the pervasiveness of minimum adequate care among students using previous year depression signs. A sample of 8488 students was interviewed. The study found out enough depression care among college students is important (Eisenberg 220).

Rebecca Voelker: Stress, Sleep Loss, and Substance Abuse Create Potent Recipe for College Depression: American Medical Association May 12, 2004Vol 291, No. 18

The article illustrates that students do admire comfortable life since they experience territorial issue as they stay in colleges to learn in the dark room as they jockey in their desks. Nevertheless, the pressure of adjusting to university life where the majority are all- nighters, weekends that are keg-drenched, and easy accessibility of illegal drugs, results to stress. Such discovery is making expert start understanding the relationship that lack of sleep, drug abuse, and stress has while depression keeps on increasing among students (Voelker 2178). The article credits the discovery to the recent brain imaging studies in both animals and people that described how depressed, human, and addicted brains react and behave.

Works cited

Chung, Henry, et al. "A pilot for improving depression care on college campuses: results of the College Breakthrough SeriesDepression (CBS-D) Project." Journal of American College Health 59.7 (2011): 628-639.

Eisenberg, Daniel, and Henry Chung. "Adequacy of depression treatment among college students in the United States." General hospital psychiatry 34.3 (2012): 213-220.

Furr, Susan R., et al. "Suicide and depression among college students: A decade later." Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 32.1 (2001): 97.

Hill, Ryan M., Ilya Yaroslavsky, and Jeremy W. Pettit. "Enhancing depression screening to identify college students at risk for persistent depressive symptoms." Journal of affective disorders 174 (2015): 1-6.

Lester, David. "COLLEGE STUDENT STRESSORS, DEPRESSION, AND SUICIDAL IDEATION 1." Psychological reports 114.1 (2014): 293-296.

Mahmoud, Jihan Saber Raja, et al. "The relationship among young adult college students depression, anxiety, stress, demographics, life satisfaction, and coping styles." Issues in mental health nursing 33.3 (2012): 149-156.

Regestein, Quentin, et al. "Sleep debt and depression in female college students." Psychiatry research 176.1 (2010): 34-39.

Voelker, Rebecca. "Stress, sleep loss, and substance abuse create potent recipe for college depression." JAMA 291.18 (2004): 2177-2179.

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