Human Rights and Forced Migrations

Date:  2021-03-01 19:57:25
2 pages  (580 words)
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This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.
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This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

Refugee flows and violations of human rights go hand-in-hand. Refugees are prima facie indication of abuse and vulnerability of human rights because individuals of are dispossessed their households, societies and means of livelihood and persecuted are forced to frequently flee across their home-country borders to seek safety elsewhere. Over 50 million individuals are fatalities of forced displacements as result of violence, human rights abuse, war and political and ethnic tension. Forced migration is a concern to human rights, but it also raised severe security and political issues. Migrants and refugees are blamed of heightening pressure on national identities and social cohesion, and are the center of popular aggression in most of the countries. A solution to the issues of forced migration needs not only humanitarian actions, but also ordinated strategic and political responses (McAdam, 2008).

Assessment of the Problem

Individuals who are fleeing persecution by crossing borders to pursue safety and protection in the neighboring states territory are deliberated to be refugees. Those refugees who lack safety and protection in a nearby host country travel over the continent to find asylum in countries that are industrialized. Internally Displaced Persons are individuals in a refugee-like circumstance who ought to have remained in the home country. The majority of IDP and refugee movements are triggered by ethnic strife and persecution, war, sharp inequalities in socio-economic and weak institutions, or a combination of all the factors that I have mentioned. Refugees can be exposed to further violation of human rights while in exile, through discrimination, enforced encampment, exploitation and extortion, as well as other violations of human rights (Afifi, & Jager, 2010).

Economic Migrants and the Asylum

There are individuals who leave their home countries due to economic problems they are known as economic migrants and these migrants do not qualify protection of UNHCR or assistance. Nevertheless, in many third world countries with less resources and government structures that are weak, economic struggles are generally worsened by political conflicts. While economic struggle is the proximate reason for them to flee, the primary reasons are political violence and therefore it becomes increasingly hard to distinguish between the economic migrants and refugees. Globalization has established new incentives and opportunities for worldwide migrants. It has come with it improved telecommunications and transportation developments, inclusive of expanded use of network sites and social media. These developments have backed growth of South to North migrations ever since 1980s and were center of political protests explosion in the Middle East and North America in recent times. Since legal migration access has become limited across Global North illegal and economic migrants have turned to the same trafficking routines to evade control at the bounders crossing and claim asylum refugee in Western countries (Kneebones, & Rawlimgs-Sanaei, 2007).

Conclusion

Forced migration is a concern to human rights, but it also raised severe security and political issues. Migrants and refugees are blamed of heightening pressure on national identities and social cohesion, and are the center of popular aggression in most of the countries. A solution to the issues of forced migration needs not only humanitarian actions, but also ordinated strategic and political responses. Refugees can be exposed to further violation of human rights while in exile, through discrimination, enforced encampment, exploitation and extortion, as well as other violations of human rights.

References

Afifi, T. & Jager, J. (2010). Environment, forced migration and social vulnerability. Berlin: Springer.

McAdam, J. (2008). Forced migration, human rights and security. Oxford: Hart.

Kneebones, S., & Rawlimgs-Sanaei, F. (2007). New regionalism and asylum seekers: Challenges ahead. New York: Berghahn Books.

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