Movie Review Example: The Beasts of the Southern Wild

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Carnegie Mellon University
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The Film: Beasts of the Southern Wild focusses on highlighting the experiences of Hushpuppy, who is a six-year-old girl living in a fanciful place identified as Bathtub. Katrina Catastrophe is the setting of this film, and it is designed and produced expertly to convey various themes blighting the society whenever such calamities strike. The bathtub, which is a piece of land in the rural area bordering Louisiana. It is in this place that Hushpuppy and her charismatic and hailing father lived. The movie explores different themes and messages which are pertinent in the contemporary society, such as poverty culture.

The theory of poverty culture asserts that residing in conditions of the widespread poverty will pave the way for the development of a culture reflecting such conditions (Lewis 22). In the film Beasts of the Southern Wild, most of the characters are portrayed to be living in abject poverty. Those residing in the bathtub depict features which have been highlighted in the theory of poverty culture. However, it can claim that the detachment from the major societal institutions is an indication that there are some elements and values that this community is striving to achieve. The film is trying to highlight the solidarity and togetherness of the poor people living in the bathtub. By using Hushpuppy and Wink, who is her father, the poor people are depicted as happy and loving inhabitants. Furthermore, the social system adopted in the bathtub can be termed as resourceful and ready to work for the better future. This can make the viewer embrace an intrinsic perspective on the poor, who boasts of happiness and solidarity, which are core values and practices of a united society.

Hushpuppy and Wink, who are the main characters in this film are also the representation of poverty. Their grimy appearance, culminated with shoddy garments highlight the challenges that this family is undergoing as far as access to the essential commodities of food, clothing, and shelter is concerned. In the movie industry, the film directors have the tendencies of demeaning the characters from a lower class. However, this film opts to go against the prevailing conventions of in the industry by giving this marginalized and poverty-stricken characters the much-needed positive image. From this point of view, it can be asserted that the film was targeting at correcting the shattering stereotypes that have been labeled against people from humble backgrounds (Nyon 6). It indicates that people should be judged on their abilities as well as what they can deliver. For instance, Hushpuppy and Wink are the protagonist of the story, irrespective of coming from a society that is characterized by poverty.

The high levels of poverty have made people vulnerable to various calamities. The place where Hushpuppy and Wink stay is susceptible to damage. This is attested by the fire which is set by Hushpuppy. The occurrence of the storm, which ends up flooding the whole town overnight also depicts the helpless state of the people from this community. Such unconducive conditions adversely impact on the upbringing of Hushpuppy. At her young age, she is compelled to fend for herself, especially when her father decides to look for professional medical services.

It is apparent that the theme of poverty has been prevalent in the Beasts of the Southern Wild. However, the film uses poverty to put an emphasis on the message of determination and togetherness as the core values that can help a community to overcome various forms of challenges.

Works Cited

BUTMAN, JEREMY. "'Beasts of the Southern Wild' Director: Louisiana Is a Dangerous Utopia." The Atlantic (2012): 1-6. print.

Lewis, Oscar. Five Families: Mexican Case Studies in the Culture of Poverty. Basic Books, 1975. print.

Nyon, Yeewon. "Beasts of the Southern Wild: Class themes in Oscar nominees." Classism Exposed (2013): 2-9. print.

 

 

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