Literature Review

Date:  2021-03-02 10:44:21
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Transformation. Social Alternatives, 15(3), 9-12.

Bosserman and McCormick explore the issues surrounding conflict resolution in their study. The authors propose alternative means to conflict resolution that do not involve surface change, but implement deeper strategies to solve conflicts. Culture is identified as a long-term factor that affects conflicts and their resolution. Bosserman and McCormick argue that it would not be effective to be effective to resolve conflicts without an understanding of culture in the workplace. An understanding of culture in the workplace according to Bosserman and McCormick creates a better platform for the development of effective conflict resolution solutions. In addition, the capacity of individuals in management to resolve conflict is aided by a better grasp of culture. Cultural change is identified as an effective way of resolving conflicts especially when dealing with incompatible needs, as observed by Bosserman and McCormick.

Drasgow F, Olson JB, Keenan PA, Moberg PJ, Mead A. (1993). Computerized assessment.

Drasgow, Keenan, Moberg and Mead in their study develop an interactive video of assessment of conflict resolution skills. The video is part of their study to identify effective conflict resolution skills. The researchers employed an ideal mechanism of conflict management to establish possible conflict situations and scoring keys. 347 supervisors were subjected to computer assessment of conflict resolution skills and information on their job performance ratings was obtained from their managers. From the study, it was established that supervisory ratings and conflict skills assessment were closely associated with ability to manage conflicts while on the job. However, conflict skills assessment and ability to manage conflicts while on the job were found to have no connection to the levels of cognitive ability in individuals. For women, there was no negative impact on conflict skills assessment. The study set a precedent for further research on the topic of conflict resolution in the workplace.

Jeffery, A., Blitman, B., Maes, J. D., & Shearer, R. A. (2003). Using collaborative modeling to mediate workplace conflicts. Equal Opportunities International, 22(5), 25-30. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/199534629?accountid=14872

Jeffery, Blitman, Maes and Shearer examine the use of collaborative modeling to mediate on conflicts in the workplace. The research probes the prevalence of conflicts in the workplace and the possible remedies to conflict. The study establishes the importance of mediation to both employer and employees in conflict resolution. According to the researchers, for a suitable conflict resolution mechanism to be created in the workplace, managers have to develop a culture of team collaboration and communication in the context of problem solving skills in the workplace. Not only should these skills be impressed on employees in problem solving teams, but also other staff in the workplace. The study further states that managers serving as mediators in problem solving can take the opportunity to study the background causes of conflicts and with this knowledge establish efficient problem solving mechanisms.

Olson-Buchanan, J., Drasgow, F., Moberg, P. J., Mead, A. D., & al, e. (1998). Interactive video

assessment of conflict resolution skills. Personnel Psychology, 51(1), 1-24. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/220135633?accountid=14872The use of interactive video assessment is further investigated in this study to establish the impact of situational judgment tests in predicting job performance. Situational judgment tests have been in use since the 1920s and recently, as observed by Olson-Buchanan et al., there has been resurgence in research on the effectiveness of SJT in evaluating work performance. SJT has been attributed to being a highly effective tool in measuring of certain constructs in the performance evaluation of the workplace as stated by Olson-Buchanan et al. the research also attributes less adverse impacts and higher incremental validity to situational judgment tests. However, as Olson-Buchanan et al., point out, the lingering issue with situational judgment tests is the selection criteria for scoring options that is arousing research interest. Situational judgment tests are a useful alternative in the study of abilities in conflict resolution.

Sadri S and Makkar U (2013): (Eds) Future Directions in Management, Bharati Publications,

New Delhi

According to Sadri and Makkar, management is and is based on the science of making decisions. In this context, the workplace is entirely dependent on the decision making process of management. The output of the staff in relation to the organizations goals is entirely dependent on the decisions made by the management. In the future, there is a growing tendency to research with a connection of management to industrial sociology and industrial psychology. In addition, as Sadri and Makkar observe, there is also attention focused on supply chain management and its connection to organizational restructuring.

Manrai, L. A., & Manrai, A. K. (2010). The Influence of Culture in International Business

Negotiations: A New Conceptual Framework and Managerial Implications. Journal of Transnational Management, 15(1), 69-100.

Manrai and Manrai in this article seek to create a new conceptual framework that would include the impact of culture in affecting international business relations. The new conceptual framework is established on six major premises. These premises include Negotiator's Goals that are mainly the objectives the negotiator seeks to achieve. Another premise is Negotiator's Inclinations that involve the tendencies towards which the negotiator leans. In addition, there is the Negotiator's Qualifications that are based on their experience and training. Another premise is Nontask Activities that involve activities indirectly related to the negotiation. Other premises are Negotiation Processes, and Negotiation Outcomes.

Khan, S., Mukhtar, S., & Niazi, M. A. K. (2010). Link between organizational justice and

employee job performance in the work place. Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business, 2(3), 121-132.

The study carried out by Khan, Mukhtar and Niazi was aimed at investigating the manner in which employees perception of justice is connected to their output in the workplace. The study determined that distributive, procedural, and interactional justice perceptions had a high level of correlation to the output of employees in an organization. A simple linear regression model with two numbers was run to determine the impact of sample size on the results. Distributive justice was determined to have a significantly higher impact on performance output than other forms of justice.

Feidakis, A., & Tsaoussi, A. (2009). Competitiveness, Gender and Ethics in Legal Negotiations:

Some Empirical Evidence. International Negotiation, 14(3), 537-570.

Feidakis and Tsaoussi use a gender based approach to examine the process of legal negotiations. According to Feidakis and Tsaoussi, women are less able negotiators and are therefore at a disadvantage in benefitting from opportunities in economic, social or family settings in a wide range of bargaining backgrounds. However, the results from a Greek setting provide a differing opinion from this perception as put forward by Feidakis and Tsaoussi. According to the study by Feidakis and Tsaoussi, differences attributed to gender are less pronounced in Greek settings. In addition, the results of favorable outcomes in negotiating were attributed to personal characteristics such as competitive negotiating style, persuasion, social and emotional intelligence.

Stuhlmacher, A. F., & Morrissett, M. G. (2008). Men and women as mediators: Disputant

perceptions. International Journal of Conflict Management, 19(3), 249-261.

Stuhlmacher and Morrissett in their study give a quantitative analysis of current research that relates perceptions about male and female negotiators in a bid to provide a better grasp of the impact which it affects the disputing entities' understanding of the mediation. The study was carried out by searching through databases established between 1967-2007. Relevant research studies and articles in relation to gender and mediation were analyzed. From the studies, it was established that male negotiators were more positively perceived than their female counterparts were. From the study, it can be concluded that women face more additional barriers than male counterparts in negotiations do. In addition, it can be concluded that there is need for more research into the barriers that women face in the field of mediation.

Harris, K., Andrews, M., & Kacmar, K. (2007). The Moderating Effects of Justice on the

Relationship Between Organizational Politics and Workplace Attitudes. Journal Of Business & Psychology, 22(2), 135-144. doi:10.1007/s10869-007-9054-9

Harris, Andrews and Kacmar in their study observe that from research, investigations into the perceptions of organization politics usually result in detrimental effects for individuals. Distributive and procedural justice are extensively mentioned in the research, Subsequently, Harris, Andrews and Kacmar explore the impact of distributive and procedural justice in relation to perceptions of organizational politics, job satisfaction and turnover intentions. From their study, they establish that job satisfaction perceptions were reduced when both forms of justice were strong. In addition, politics had a big role when there was unfair distribution of justice as compared to when procedures were not fair.

 

References

Bosserman, C. P., & McCormick, M. A. (1996). From Conflict Resolution to Cultural

Transformation. Social Alternatives, 15(3), 9-12.

Drasgow F, Olson JB, Keenan PA, Moberg PJ, Mead A. (1993). Computerized assessment.

Jeffery, A., Blitman, B., Maes, J. D., & Shearer, R. A. (2003). Using collaborative modeling to

mediate workplace conflicts. Equal Opportunities International, 22(5), 25-30. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/199534629?accountid=14872

Olson-Buchanan, J., Drasgow, F., Moberg, P. J., Mead, A. D., & al, e. (1998). Interactive video

assessment of conflict resolution skills. Personnel Psychology, 51(1), 1-24. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/220135633?accountid=14872Sadri S and Makkar U (2013): (eds) Future Directions in Management, Bharati Publications,

New Delhi

Manrai, L. A., & Manrai, A. K. (2010). The Influence of Culture in International Business

Negotiations: A New Conceptual Framework and Managerial Implications. Journal Of Transnational Management, 15(1), 69-100.

Khan, S., Mukhtar, S., & Niazi, M. A. K. (2010). Link between organizational justice and

employee job performance in the work place. Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business, 2(3), 121-132.

Feidakis, A., & Tsaoussi, A. (2009). Competitiveness, Gender and Ethics in Legal Negotiations:

Some Empirical Evidence. International Negotiation, 14(3), 537-570.

Stuhlmacher, A. F., & Morrissett, M. G. (2008). Men and women as mediators: Disputant

perceptions. International Journal of Conflict Management, 19(3), 249-261.

Harris, K., Andrews, M., & Kacmar, K. (2007). The Moderating Effects of Justice on the

Relationship Between Organizational Politics and Workplace Attitudes. Journal Of Business & Psychology, 22(2), 135-144. doi:10.1007/s10869-007-9054-9

 

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